Tuesday, April 21, 2015

ANZAC Day

We have been learning about ANZAC day this week - where Gallipoli is, when it happened, how we landed at the wrong beach, why we were in Turkey, reasons for the great loss of life etc.
There are links to some good videos in the 'Topic' page of this blog - Flanders Field poem, Maori Battalion article, song re why we have a minute's silence etc.
If you have any stories about some of your family members who were involved in any wars, or have any memories to share of visiting any war graves overseas, or have been to Gallipoli, or have been to a parade before etc please share them with us in the comment section below.
Thank you

We have made a connection today via email with Lloyd Burr, an ex pupil who is now a political reporter for Mediaworks - (Radio Live and TV3 news), who is currently at Gallipoli. We will be asking him questions over the next few days about his experiences. Here is a link to one of his reports where he talks about his relatives who were in the war.

Lloyd Burr radio interview

Very Good Website with 3D re-ennactment of Gallipoli

Click on the photo below to link to an article on Sunlive



8 comments:

  1. My Grandfather served in WW2 in the Pacific Islands - I never heard him speak about it - ever. I have visited many war graves in Belgium, Thailand etc and always had a silent weep as I looked at the ages of the young soldiers. I was shocked by how many graves there were - rows and rows and rows - so many lives lost.

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  2. Bruce and I were at the 89th ANZAC commemoration in Gallipoli, Turkey. We snuggled in our sleeping bags in the fields above those awful cliffs with thousands of others from all over the world and watched the sun come up over what was the battlefield all those years ago. The army band played, the lone bugle sounded, people spoke and, while it was extremely somber, the juxtaposition of where we were among all those graves and memories with the absolute camaraderie and kinship of the people there (both visitors and residents) highlighted what they all had been fighting for. It was the absolute sacrifice that should never be forgotten or taken for granted. We were (and are) very proud to be Kiwis that day.

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  3. Kiira was fortunate enough to have had 2 Great Grand Fathers who both served in the 28th Maori Battalion. This year in July, his older brother, Marangai will be embarking on a 17 day tour of Greece, Italy & Tunisia to re-trace the steps of their fore-fathers. This will be an exciting opportunity & a wonderful experience. While overseas, he will also pay homage to his Great Grand Fathers younger brother who is buried in a war cemetery in Faenza, Italy. Our family will be extremely proud of this occasion. Every year as a whanau we pay our respects to all our fallen soldiers at the dawn parade. Cheri Parkinson.

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    1. That will be a once in a lifetime special honour for Marangai. What a fortunate young man, and such an honour to be chosen to attend. Goes to show the importance of always representing yourself and your family well -putting your best foot forward.

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  4. My Grandfather served in WW2 in the Pacific also. He did not speak of the war either, but did share one story with us all at his 50th Wedding Anniversary. He told us the story so that we would understand the depth of his gratitude to his comrades who did not come home from war and his thankfulness that he had the luxury of a great life.

    The story he told was of being in one of three small boats and having to go ashore Mana Island under the cover of darkness. Japanese soldiers were known to be in the jungle watching the beaches. Grandfather and mates had to silently slip out of the boat, into the water, holding their guns above their heads so they didn't get wet. The first boat load of men had made it into the shallows when the gunfire began killing most of the men from the first boat. Grandfather said the beach was lit up by gunfire and that he and his mates immediately headed for parts of the beach where they saw no gunfire. He said the fighting that continued over the next couple of days, as they flushed the Japanese soldiers out of the Jungle, was terrible. He was amazed that anyone got out of there alive.
    So Grandfather was ever mindful of those soldiers that were killed on that day. He could easily have been unlucky enough to be in that first boat.

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  5. Jack and Toby's Great Grandfather Alexander Douglas Calvert, fought in WW1, he was signed on in 1916 and fought at Passchendaele ridge In October 1917. The first attached cost 340 New Zealand lives and the second attack was described as the worst fiasco in New Zealand's military history. In just a few hours 845 men were killed. It is the highest one-day death toll suffered by New Zealand forces overseas to date.

    Jack and Toby's Mum is also currently involved in refurbishing the Mount RSA. Its an extremely special project and humbling to be involved at this time 100 years on.

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    1. wow- it would be interesting to know what sort of themes / symbolism, use of colour /furnishings etc you are planning for the refurb...keep us in the loop

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  6. Anna's grandfather was born on the very last day of world war ll. Everyone in the family was very happy but when they got home they found out their house had been bombed earlier on that day. So Norman Hesmondhalgh did not have a very good first day in life but if it wasn't for him I would never have been born.
    I have always felt that ANZAC is special to me even though I am from the United Kingdom.

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